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Gallipolis- PC-778 - History

Gallipolis- PC-778 - History


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Gallipolis

A town in southern Ohio on the Ohio River, 30 miles northeast of Ironton.

(PC-778: dp. 295; 1. 173'8"; b. 23'; dr. 10'10"; s. 20.2 k.; cgl. 66, a. 1 3", 1 40mm., 3 20mm., 2 rkt., 4 dep., 2

dct.; cl. PC-461)

PC-778 was laid down 7 September 1942 by Commercial Iron Works, Portland Oreg.; launched 2~ November 1942, sponsored by Miss Virginia Sering; and commissioned 30 April 1943, Lt. TV. R. Herrick in command.

The new submarine chaser departed Astoria, Oreg., 21 May 1943 for shakedown out of San Diego. For the next year she operated along the West Coast as an escort, patrol, and aircraft-target ship. PC-778 departed Seattle 21 May 1944 for Alaska and arrived Dutch Harbor a week later for patrol and escort duty on the Aleutians. PC 778 departed Adak 15 November and returned to Seattle on the 26th.

After a four-month overhaul the submarine chaser made two escort voyages to the Hawaiian Islands. Upon arrival at Pearl Harbor 2 April 1945, she performed patrol and escort duty in the Hawaiian Islands and made one voyage to Canton Island. On 3 July, she sailed for Midway Island to assist in training submarines and to continue patrol duty.

After the war ended, PC-448 departed Midway 1 September for the West Coast, via Pearl Harbor and arrived Lost Angeles Harbor on the 28th. She sailed for the East Coast 11 October, transited the Panama Canal on the 26th and arrived Key West, Fla., D November. A month later the submarine chaser reported to Green Cove Springs, Fla. PC-778 transferred to Charleston, where she served as a reserve training ship until decommissioning in October 1949 and entered the Atlantic Reserve Fleet at Norfolk. The veteran submarine chaser was named Gallipois 15 February 1956 and was struck from the Navy List 1 April 1957 and sold to Hughes Brothers, Inc., 15 September 1969.


Four arrested in Gallia County drug bust

GALLIA COUNTY, Ohio. (WSAZ) -Four people have been arrested after a drug bust in Gallia County.

Gallia County Sheriff Matt Champlin says deputies searched a home on Watson Grove Rd. in Cheshire Thursday night.

According to Sheriff Champlin, deputies were able to secure a warrant after weeks of investigation, including controlled purchases from the home. They found drugs and money inside.

47-year-old Robert Roush of Cheshire, Ohio has been arrested for failure to appear and trafficking in drugs, 40-year-old Amanda Mathews of Eastman, Georgia was arrested for an outstanding theft warrant, 43-year-old Paula Champer of Gallipolis, Ohio was arrested for two outstanding failure to appear warrants, and 46-year-old Matthew Oxyer of Point Pleasant, West Virginia was arrested for three outstanding failure to appear warrants.

Sheriff Champlin says though some of the suspects were taken into custody on active arrest warrants, more charges are pending.


Gallipolis- PC-778 - History

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County Information
Formed on March 25, 1803 from portions of Adams and Washington counties.
County Seat: Gallipolis

Named by residents after the kingdom of Gaul in France, the Gallia County name originated from the Latin word for France. In the 1790's French immigrants came to the United States in search for land that was offered by land speculators who represented the Scioto Company. These French settlers built their settlement in Ohio in Gallipolis, which meant, "city of the Gauls." After their arrival, the settlers found that they had been conned. Many moved on but those who stayed paid for their land or had to move on to land set aside by the U. S. government known as the French Grant. Those who purchased their land were among the first white settlers of Gallia County.
In the early 1800's the Welsh began to immigrate to the United States from poverty stricten areas of Wales. The Welsh began arriving in Gallipolis, mostly by accident. A group of Welsh immigrants migrating toward Paddy's Run in Butler Co., Ohio, were in need of provisions and stopped at Gallipolis. After sending a scout to survey the area, they were met by the French inhabitants of the area. They were welcomed and invited to stay the night. During the night a terrible storm came across the area and the Welsh lost their flatboat. Whether or not it was caused by the storm or by human hand, no one will ever know. A few days later, the boat was found and the men prepared for their journey on to Paddy's Run. The women stood up to their men and demanded that they stay right where they were. They refused to accompany their husbands on down the river. The men decided to stay in Gallia Co., Ohio. News arrived in Wales about the bountiful area and others found their way into Gallia county, making the area one of the largest Welsh settlements in the area. (Source: "The Welsh of Columbus, Ohio: A Study in Adaptation and Assimilation" A Thesis By Daniel Jenkins Williams, pg 24. pub. 1914 Ohio State University.)


County Courthouse
18 Locust Street
Gallipolis, Ohio 45631-1294

Villages
Centerville * Cheshire * Crown City * Gallipolis * Rio Grande * Vinton


Gallipolis- PC-778 - History

Charcoal Furnaces of the Hanging Rock Iron Region, by Virgil and Marguerite Ramsey. Pictures and general information about charcoal furnaces in Southeastern Ohio.

Where can I find a copy?:
1. The Jackson City Library, 21 Broadway St., Jackson Ohio 45640. Phone (740) 286-4111.

French Five-Hundred and Other Papers, by William G. Sibley, 1901, 303p.

Where can I find a copy?:
1. The State Library of Ohio, 274 East First Avenue, Columbus Ohio 43201. Phone (614) 644-7061.
2. Dr. Samuel L. Bossard Memorial Library, 7 Spruce St., Gallipolis Ohio 45631. Phone (740) 446-7323, Fax (740) 446-1701.

The French Five-Hundred, by William G. Sibley, 1933, 108p.

Where can I find a copy?:
1. The State Library of Ohio, 274 East First Avenue, Columbus Ohio 43201. Phone (614) 644-7061.
2. For sale by Gallia County Historical/Genealogical Society (see my page about them).
3. Kent State University, Kent, Ohio www.kent.edu (not a reference book, might be available by interlibrary loan).

Gallia County, Ohio, People in History to 1980, by Gallia County Historical Society, 1980.

Where can I find a copy?:
1. The State Library of Ohio, 274 East First Avenue, Columbus Ohio 43201. Phone (614) 644-7061.
2. Dr. Samuel L. Bossard Memorial Library, 7 Spruce St., Gallipolis Ohio 45631. Phone (740) 446-7323, Fax (740) 446-1701.

Gallia County One Room Schools: The Cradle Years, by Estivaun Matthews, Charles A. Murray, and Pauline Rife, Gallia County Historical Society, 1993.

Where can I find a copy?:
1. Dr. Samuel L. Bossard Memorial Library, 7 Spruce St., Gallipolis Ohio 45631. Phone (740) 446-7323, Fax (740) 446-1701.
2. The Jackson City Library, 21 Broadway St., Jackson Ohio 45640. Phone (740) 286-4111.
3. Many other libraries, especially in southeastern Ohio.
4. For sale by Gallia County Historical/Genealogical Society (see my page about them).

Gallipolis, by Writer's Program, 1940, 47p.

Where can I find a copy?:
1. The State Library of Ohio, 274 East First Avenue, Columbus Ohio 43201. Phone (614) 644-7061.

Gallipolis, Ohio: A Pictorial History, by Henrietta Evans, John Lester, and Mary Woods, 1990.

Where can I find a copy?:
1. Dr. Samuel L. Bossard Memorial Library, 7 Spruce St., Gallipolis Ohio 45631. Phone (740) 446-7323, Fax (740) 446-1701.

Geology of Southern Ohio, by Wilbur Stout, 1916. A geological survey.

Where can I find a copy?:
1. The Jackson City Library, 21 Broadway St., Jackson Ohio 45640. Phone (740) 286-4111.

Haning-Atwood Vision: History of Rio Grande College, by Anna C. Pabst, 1989.

Where can I find a copy?:
1. The Jackson City Library, 21 Broadway St., Jackson Ohio 45640. Phone (740) 286-4111.

The Harris Story, by Charles H. Harris, 1957, 329p., indexed separately.

Where can I find a copy?:
1. The State Library of Ohio, 274 East First Avenue, Columbus Ohio 43201. Phone (614) 644-7061.

Historical Hand Atlas of Gallia and Lawrence Counties, by H. H. Hardesty, 1882, indexed separately.

Where can I find a copy?:
1. The State Library of Ohio, 274 East First Avenue, Columbus Ohio 43201. Phone (614) 644-7061.

History of the Early French Settlers, by Naret and Bureau.

Where can I find a copy?:
1. For sale by Gallia County Historical/Genealogical Society (see my page about them).

History of Gallia County, Ohio, by H. H. Hardesty, 1882 (reprinted 1976).

Where can I find a copy?:
1. The State Library of Ohio, 274 East First Avenue, Columbus Ohio 43201. Phone (614) 644-7061.
2. Dr. Samuel L. Bossard Memorial Library, 7 Spruce St., Gallipolis Ohio 45631. Phone (740) 446-7323, Fax (740) 446-1701.
3. The Jackson City Library, 21 Broadway St., Jackson Ohio 45640. Phone (740) 286-4111.
4. Many other libraries, especially in southeastern Ohio.
5. For sale by Gallia County Historical/Genealogical Society (see my page about them).

History of Gallia County Courthouses, by Hill.

Where can I find a copy?:
1. For sale by Gallia County Historical/Genealogical Society (see my page about them).

History of the Settlement of Gallipolis, Ohio in 1790, by Mary LeClercq-Ford, 1890

Where can I find a copy?:
1. Dr. Samuel L. Bossard Memorial Library, 7 Spruce St., Gallipolis Ohio 45631. Phone (740) 446-7323, Fax (740) 446-1701.

History of Welsh Settlements in Jackson and Gallia Counties of Ohio, by William R. Evans, 1896 (reprinted 1988), 72p., indexed. Covers 1818-1850.

Where can I find a copy?:
1. The State Library of Ohio, 274 East First Avenue, Columbus Ohio 43201. Phone (614) 644-7061.
2. The Jackson City Library, 21 Broadway St., Jackson Ohio 45640. Phone (740) 286-4111.
3. Dr. Samuel L. Bossard Memorial Library, 7 Spruce St., Gallipolis Ohio 45631. Phone (740) 446-7323, Fax (740) 446-1701.

Index to Gallipolis, Ohio, History of the Establishment of Five-Hundred French in the Ohio Valley. by Helene Foure-Selter, 1939, (index is English, text of book is French).

Where can I find a copy?:
1. The State Library of Ohio, 274 East First Avenue, Columbus Ohio 43201. Phone (614) 644-7061.

Index to Hardesty's 1882 History of Gallia County, Ohio, by Mary Ann Wood ed., 1988, 67p.

Where can I find a copy?:
1. Dr. Samuel L. Bossard Memorial Library, 7 Spruce St., Gallipolis Ohio 45631. Phone (740) 446-7323, Fax (740) 446-1701.
2. The Jackson City Library, 21 Broadway St., Jackson Ohio 45640. Phone (740) 286-4111.
3. Many other libraries, especially in southeastern Ohio.
4. For sale by Gallia County Historical/Genealogical Society (see my page about them).

In Faith, In Hope, In Charity, With Fidelity, by Charles A. Murray, 1991. About Eno Grange #2080, 1916-1991.

Where can I find a copy?:
1. Dr. Samuel L. Bossard Memorial Library, 7 Spruce St., Gallipolis Ohio 45631. Phone (740) 446-7323, Fax (740) 446-1701.

Lamp of the Hills: The Authorized Centennial History of Rio Grande College, by James Sherman Porter, 1977.

Where can I find a copy?:
1. The Jackson City Library, 21 Broadway St., Jackson Ohio 45640. Phone (740) 286-4111.

The Railway Reflector: Gallipolis, Ohio, by ?, April 1897 (reprinted 1986).

Where can I find a copy?:
1. The State Library of Ohio, 274 East First Avenue, Columbus Ohio 43201. Phone (614) 644-7061.
2. Dr. Samuel L. Bossard Memorial Library, 7 Spruce St., Gallipolis Ohio 45631. Phone (740) 446-7323, Fax (740) 446-1701.
3. For sale by Gallia County Historical/Genealogical Society (see my page about them).

Symmes Creek: Historical Events and Stories of "The Symmes Valley" (including Jackson, Gallia, and Lawrence Counties, Ohio), by Wayne B. Ingles, 1976

Where can I find a copy?:
1. The State Library of Ohio, 274 East First Avenue, Columbus Ohio 43201. Phone (614) 644-7061.

Standard History of the Hanging Rock Iron Region of Ohio, by E. B. Willard, 1916 (reprinted 1983), 1356p., 2 vols., indexed

Where can I find a copy?:
1. The State Library of Ohio, 274 East First Avenue, Columbus Ohio 43201. Phone (614) 644-7061.
2. The Jackson City Library, 21 Broadway St., Jackson Ohio 45640. Phone (740) 286-4111.
3. Herbert Wescoat Memorial Library, 120 North Market St., McArthur Ohio 45651. Phone (740) 596-5691, Fax (740) 596-2477.
4. Many other libraries, especially in southeastern Ohio.

Then and Now in Centreville-Thurman Ohio, compiled by Olwen Williams.

Where can I find a copy?:
1. The Jackson City Library, 21 Broadway St., Jackson Ohio 45640. Phone (740) 286-4111.

Return to Gallia County home page

The maintainer of this page is Charles R. Weese: [email protected]

Please do not ask the page maintainer any specific genealogical questions unless he has volunteered to do lookups in specific sources on another page of this site. Specific questions, such as where do I find such-and-such and do you know anything about so-and-so's family are best handled in queries or on the mailing list.


Gallipolis- PC-778 - History

The first men who enlisted in Gallia county, at the breaking out of the rebellion in 1861, were for the three months' service. One company was organized at Gallipolis of the latter part of April, and formed a part of the 18th Regiment Ohio Infantry, which was sent to Parkersburg, and thence to the interior of West Virginia. During May, 1861, application was made to Governor Dennison for authority to raise another company, but the one making the application was told by the governor that applications were already on file, tendering more men than the State could ever expect to use in crushing the rebellion. At the suggestion of the Governor, who gave a strong letter upon the subject, an interview was had with General George B. McClellan, then stationed at Cincinnati. General McClellan, after listening to the representations made, gave authority for the organization of loyal Virginians. Under this authority the enlistment of men for three years was begun, with headquarters at Mason City, Virginia. Gallia county supplied many men for this service before Ohio began organizing three years' regiments. Three hundred of them were probably mustered into the 4th Virginia Infantry, under command of officers from Gallia county. During the spring and summer of 1861, an equal number entered other than Ohio regiments. The location of Gallipolis had much to do with the early enlistments of her sons in the Union army. For many years before the war, the town had been the depot of supplies for the entire Kanawha (Virginia) Valley, and at the inception of the rebellion the Confederates looked upon the ssession of this valley with a jealous eye, and at an early day Governor Henry A. Wise, of Virginia, was sent as the commandant of the rebel troops, with his headquarters at Charleston. Officers and troops from his command were sent to Buffalo, twenty miles up the Kanawha from Gallipolis, and steamboats were in daily communication between Gallipolis and Charleston, passing Buffalo. Arms and munitions of war were purchased by Confederate emissaries in Cincinnati and brought to the Kanawha, passing, unheeded on steamboats and by private conveyance. Early in the history of the war, extensive rifle-pits were constructed upon the hills surrounding Gallipolis, and every road entering the town was properly defended. During the seasons of greatest excitement, messengers would be sent throughout the country and the citizens would respond, promptly assembling at Gallipolis by hundreds, armed with rifles. A constant guard was kept, and the citizens, old and young, each had thus more or less experience in the pleasing pastime of lying in the rifle-pits, during all kinds of weather, waiting for some one to shoot at. Soon after the opening of hostilities, Hon. Albert Gallatin Jenkins, a member of Congress and a popular man, engaged in the organization of troops for service in the rebel army, at a point a few miles below Gallipolis. Among his recruits were many who had attended school at Gallipolis, and were familiar with every avenue of approach hence the people looked with alarm upon the probable events of the future, and Gallipolis became one of the prominent points upon which the accumulating storm clouds that were enveloping the country were expected to burst. The Gallia Guards, a company of 77 men, were organized in April, 1861, for home duty. Henry Graham, captain James Harper, first lieutenant H. N. Ford, second lieutenant. Captain Graham soon entered the United States service, and James Harper became captain. This company rendered valuable service to the city during the war.

In the fall of 1861, Companies A and B, of the 31st Ohio, under command of Major Leffingwell, came to Gallipolis, and were superseded by the Trumbull Guards, a company enlisted in Trumbull county, especially for the purpose of serving at Gallipolis. They came in the spring of 1862, and were commanded by Captain C. W. Smith. Gallipolis was early made a general depot for the quartermaster and commissary supplies for the army of West Virginia, and during the progress of the war, became one of the most important points in the country. Knowing this to be the case the Confederates endeavored, on many occasions, to capture and destroy the supplies. The Union troops continued to occupy Charleston, Virginia, headquarters having been established there, but the valley between that point and the Ohio for a long time, continued to be occupied more or less by detached bands of Confederate troops. Between Point Pleasant and Charleston, the boats in the United States service, transporting o to the latter point, were constantly threatened and frequently attacked by the enemy—the object of the Confederates being not only to capture supplies, but to obtain possession of a boat for the transportation of troops to Gallipolis, before any alarm could be given. After the capture of this city and the immense amount of government stores there, the evident intention was to make a general raid through the State. Nothing could have prevented this if they had succeeded in the design of capturing a boat, as Gallipolis at this time was almost devoid of defense. The danger of the service on the Kanawha river boats at this time, can be readily understood. The services of many Gallia county men on the Kanawha and other river boats, and in the naval and gunboat service, deserve particular mention, but it would take a volume to record them and do the subject justice. A large number of experienced steamboat men resided in the city, who entered this branch of the service, and by reason of this knowledge of the rivers, and familiarity with the duties, as well as their eminent courage and good judgment in times of danger, rendered invaluable service.


Gallia County, Ohio: History

Tornados, Blizzards, Floods, World's Fairs and other events

  • Gallia County Storms (Source: National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration)
  • Gallia County Tornadoes (Source: The Tornado Project)
  • Gallipolis, OH Furniture Factory Fire, Apr 1911 (Source: GenDisasters)
  • Gallipolis, OH Killed by a Stick of Wood, Aug 1880 (Source: GenDisasters)
  • Gallipolis, OH Two Car Collision, Apr 1956 (Source: GenDisasters)
  • Vinton, OH Train Wreck, Jul 1901 (Source: GenDisasters)

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The Silver Bridge Collapse

The Main Street in Point Pleasant, West Virginia led straight onto an eyebar-chain style suspension bridge named "The Silver Bridge", based on its aluminum paint, that went across the Ohio river to Gallipolis, Ohio. The bridge was built in 1928. Locals would cross it on a daily basis, sometimes several times a day. At 5:05 Pm on December 15th 1967, exactly 13 months after the first Mothman sightings, the bridge was full of cars, many of them Christmas shoppers, when suddenly it began to shake. They heard The low moaning of metal and then a loud screech.

Mary Hyre was a newspaper reporters who wrote articles about the Mothman and was a close friend of John Keel, Writer of the Mothman Prophecies, they teamed up to interview witnesses of The Mothman. On November 19th 1967, she told Keel: "I had a terrible nightmare. There were a lot of people drowning in the river and Christmas packages were floating everywhere in the water. Its like something awful is going to happen." When Keel returned to Point Pleasant around Thanksgiving 1967, people in the area were having dreams and nightmares about a coming disaster. Virginia Thomas had them about people dying the water of the nearby Ohio River.

In an interview, Bridge Collapse Survivor, Charlene Wood said "When I got to the traffic light, here in point pleasant, I got the red light. When it changed I started going up onto the bridge and just about that time, the bridge started shaking". She heard a loud noise and thought that a boat had hit into the bridge underneath. She reversed her vehicle as the bridge began folding inward on itself, with her tires stopped on the ledge where it broke off.

The Bridge collapsed into the water below. Forty Six people died, nine were injured and two victims were never found. making it the worst bridge accident in American history at the time. For days rescue workers pulled smashed cars and bodies from the river. Debris littered the water, the tragedy had happened on the coldest day of the year.

The department of transportation conducted a detailed investigation of the collapse and found the cause to be a small 0.1 inch (2.5 mm) deep defect on  the 13th steel pin eye-bar on the bridge that was improperly manufactured.  

The Silver bridge was also nearly forty years old, poorly maintained and for many years had been carrying far more traffic than it was designed for.  The Silver bridge was later replaced by the "Silver Memorial Bridge", which was completed in 1969.

This historical event of The Silver Bridge Collapse impacted the Mothman urban legend. With a town busy grieving and mourning their loved ones, they no longer gave their attention to the creature sightings. The Mothman seemed to vanish, there were no more sightings at that time.

With all the sightings happening from around November 15th 1966, to December 15th 1967 and then suddenly stopping, it seemed as if it was all building towards the event.

A couple of sightings of Mothman were said to have occurred near the bridge before the incident. Rumors eventually spread that the bridge collapse was connected to the Mothman in some way and that he could have been a warning or a dark premonition. This was the beginning of The Mothman being associated as an "Omen of Doom". Mothman eventually began being reportedly seen all over the world before tragedies struck and the creature went from small town folklore to global monster icon.


07.06.2021

GALLIPOLIS CITY COMMISSION REGULAR MEETING
The next meeting of the Gallipolis City Commission will be a Regular Meeting at 6:00 p.m. on Tuesday, July 06, 2021.

In addition, the meeting will also be accessible via Zoom Meetings, similar to how the meetings were being conducted during the orders of the pandemic and under Ohio Sub H.B. 197. A link to the Zoom Meeting will be available on the City Website.

05.29.2021

Gallipolis Municipal Pool Opening
The Gallipolis Municipal Pool will open Thursday, June 3, 2021.
Hours of Operation are as follows:

MONDAY, TUESDAY, THURSDAY, FRIDAY, AND SATURDAY
12:00 - 5:00

**CLOSED ON WEDNESDAY**

***ADMISSION***
Children 4 and under - FREE
Children 5 - 17 $4.00
Adults 18+ - $6.00

***EARLYMORNINGSWIM (ADULTS 18+ ONLY - NO LIFEGUARD)***
Monday - Friday 7:30am - 9:00am Cost $1.00 per session
**Beginning June 1**

***WATER WALKERS (ADULTS 18+ ONLY - NO LIFEGUARD)***
Monday - Friday 5:00pm - 6:00pm Cost $1.00 per session
**Beginning June 1st**

***WATER AEROBICS***
Monday & Wednesday 6:00pm - 7:00pm
Saturday 10:00 - 11:00am
Cost $3.00 per session
**Beginning June 14th**

***PRIVATE POOL PARTIES*** All Parties $250.00
Monday 7:15 - 9:15pm
Tuesday 6:15 - 8:15pm
Wednesday 7:15 - 9:15pm
Thursday 6:15 - 8:15pm
Friday 6:15 - 8:15pm
Saturday 5:30 - 7:30pm
Sunday 5:30 - 7:30pm

**SWIM LESSONS**
June 14 - 25
June 28 - July 02
July 12-23
**for more Information or to register for any sessions of swimming
lessons contact Teri Miller at 304-674-3121.


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Watch the video: Gallia County Countrytown (May 2022).